In this episode, Stacy sits down with Mike Watts, the CEO and founder of DMD Products, LLC and LoveHandle. The two discuss the importance of taking risks and what it takes to be a successful entrepreneur.

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Transcripts:

Stacy Jones: 00:00
Welcome to Marketing Mistakes and How to Avoid Them. I’m Stacy Jones, the founder of influencer marketing and branded content agency, Hollywood Branded. This podcast provides brand marketers a learning platform for top experts to share their insights and knowledge on topics which make a direct impact on your business today. While it is impossible to be well versed on every topic and strategy that can improve bottom line results, my goal is to help you avoid making costly mistakes of time, energy, or money, whether you are doing a DIY approach or hiring an expert to help. Let’s begin today’s discussion.

Speaker 2: 00:31
Welcome to Marketing Mistakes and How to Avoid Them. Here’s your host, Stacy Jones.

Stacy Jones: 00:36
Welcome to Marketing Mistakes and How to Avoid Them. I’m Stacy Jones. I’m so happy to be here with you all today and want to give a very warm welcome to Mike Watts, the CEO of [inaudible 00:00:42], a fast-growing American manufacturer of patented customer smartphone grips and accessories where he leads a team of 30 full-time employees. Mike has six startup companies under his belt. He has founded three companies, including one he sold for over six million dollars. Along the way, he had the opportunity to strike a deal with Daymond John, Shark Tank.

Stacy Jones: 01:00
Mike is a keynote speaker for entrepreneur in adventure groups as well as a guest professor at Texas A&M University’s entrepreneurial program. He’s been listed in the Fortune 5,000 and is a two time winner of the Aggie 100 awards for fastest growing companies.

Stacy Jones: 01:12
Today we’re going to talk about strategies for successful entrepreneurship. What happens when you get the opportunity to be on shark tank? We’ll learn what’s worked from Mike’s experience, ways to strategically build partnerships and how to succeed as an entrepreneur. Mike, welcome.

Mike Watts: 01:25
Thank you so much Stacy. It’s an honor to be here.

Stacy Jones: 01:28
So happy to have you here today with us. And I would love to have you start off by telling our listeners a little bit about your background and what got you to where you are today.

Mike Watts: 01:38
Well, thank you. And I’m so excited to share my story. Been a full-time entrepreneur now for 14 years but started in the corporate world, did the traditional, and I went to college and got my good job in corporate America and they gave me my beautiful cubicle and I thought that I would be there forever and eventually maybe on the top floor of the skyscraper, but fate had a different plan for me and I started a side hustle kind of halfway through my career doing home and garden shows, trade shows, just trying to make some supplemental income. And eventually that grew and got to the point where I was able to identify a patented product that I wanted to take to market. So I left my corporate security blanket with three small children at home and walked away from health insurance and everything else that goes with that security and went out there and invested everything I had into this idea.

Mike Watts: 02:33
It was an aftermarket trimmer head. So anybody that’s ever cut their own grass knows the struggle that you have with winding the line on and feeding it out and breaking the line off and that. We solved that problem with this invention. And we grew that company. I partnered up with my dad and we grew up from just a sketch drawing of a product to the number one selling after market trimmer head in the world along with full very successful TV campaign back in the infomercial days and their heyday. And we sold that company in 2012 for six million dollars and was able to pay back all the investors, which fortunately was my grandparents and my aunts and uncles and good friends. And so, it was either going to be a really great Thanksgiving or a really terrible Thanksgiving. We weren’t really sure through the middle of it all, but we learned a lot about manufacturing and marketing and we made a ton of mistakes, we did a few things right and enough right that it worked out for us.

Mike Watts: 03:34
And so, since then I’ve licensed two additional patents and taken those to market. One’s an underground tree steak for planting trees with no poles and wires to hurt people or for aesthetics, better for the tree. And my baby is the love handle. It’s a low profile comfortable smartphone grip that you put on the back of any phone and lets you hold your phone with just one finger. And we’ve invested in automation equipment to be able to manufacture this in the USA 100% and that’s where our 30 employees work here, and it’s a labor of love for me at this point.

Stacy Jones: 04:10
That’s awesome. Did you ever think back to the day when you decided that you were leaving your corporate job that you are going to have this much success and this would be the end result?

Mike Watts: 04:21
Absolutely. Absolutely. I don’t think I would have left if I didn’t feel like that it was some magical destination that I was headed to. I didn’t know exactly what it looked like, and I still don’t think I’m actually there yet, but I felt like I had something big that I needed to do. I’ve always kind of felt that, and I didn’t feel like I was going to find that in corporate America. So my wife 100% believes in me. And in spite of all the worldly challenges in front of us, we took those steps of faith continuously together and have found success.

Stacy Jones: 04:58
That’s fantastic. What were some of the biggest challenges in your mindset that you thought you were going to face that actually never came to reality or that you were able to overcome?

Mike Watts: 05:12
Well, money is always an issue. Right? And I thought there would be times where we wouldn’t be able to make our rent payment or be able to put food on the table. We never came to that point, thank goodness. But there were plenty of challenges that I thought would come up and did come up. Like people that challenged us on the patents and took us to court and people that sued us because they said they got hurt with our product, and things like that, that I always said I had in the back of my mind, “I hope this doesn’t happen,” and it did, but at the end of the day it all worked out. So it was just a matter of, yeah, things can happen, but it’s just a matter of whether you define them as being good or bad.

Stacy Jones: 05:59
That’s an excellent way of looking at it. And I think that all entrepreneurs, including myself, have always had to wonder of dinner on the table, rent and mortgage, and that’s just the life of being an entrepreneur.

Mike Watts: 06:12
Definitely. Yes. It’s a constant struggle of faith. It’s a battle of faith and fear and trying to lean on the faith side and not let fear have the better of you. And I honestly believe that you can will things into existence. You can, with enough effort, perseverance and faith that life will yield those things to you. But you can’t let fear take you down because it requires risk to be able to achieve extraordinary success.

Stacy Jones: 06:45
I agree with that 100%. I love the law of attraction and all of it, however you look at it, it’s your higher being reaching out to make sure that your will is actually going to come to fruition.

Mike Watts: 06:56
Definitely.

Stacy Jones: 06:57
That’s great. So, what is some of the advice you would give other entrepreneurs who are either already on the path and they’re headed out and they are making their way or they’re still sitting in their office and they’re trying to decide if this is the future path that they should take as well?

Mike Watts: 07:16
I think that on some level, not… Obviously, entrepreneurship is not for everyone. Right? But I think you need to each take a self assessment as deep down. I think you already know whether you are cut out to be an entrepreneur, to be your own boss or not. And whether you feel like you have that drive and that ability to take risks and still be able to sleep at night, because that’s essentially what it takes. I talk about entrepreneurship as not necessarily a career path, more of an attitude about things. And you can apply on entrepreneurship across all sorts of platforms, whether it’s the way you run your home or even within a corporate environment, you can be entrepreneurial. And what we’re talking about here, it takes the attitude of being willing to take a risk, being willing to fail and being willing to learn from your failures.

Mike Watts: 08:11
Most of my success has come in ways that I didn’t really originally think. For example, I thought that the Love Handle product was going to be a slam dunk on TV because we had sold products on TV before and we spent around half a million dollars building a TV campaign and inventory and putting it on TV and it was a big fat flop. But as it turns out, what people love about it is being able to put their brand name on it, being able to logo it. It’s a ultimate Joshi item.

Mike Watts: 08:42
And so, we had to attack along the way and then now we’re one of the hottest, if not the hottest, promotional products in the world. And so, don’t be so set on the fact that you, how this is going to work out. Just know it’s a journey and that it’s going to require persistence, it’s going to require an immense amount of work and consistency. And then eventually you will find success if you’re willing to be adaptable.

Stacy Jones: 09:16
That makes sense. And so, if you had to do it all over again or at your next company, what’s a different path that you would take? Or how would you approach entrepreneurship or launching a company a little differently? Or what would you do exactly the same?

Mike Watts: 09:30
Well, I think that what I would do, I’d probably do things a little bit differently. If I was taking a product to market, I think there’s some platforms out there, some tools for entrepreneurs that didn’t exist before. In fact, I feel like we’re sort of taking a step back right now, we’re building a kickstarter campaign. Even though our company is up and running and we have 30 employees, we’ll do four million dollars in sales this year. But we’re going back and doing a kickstarter campaign because it’s such a useful tool to be able to get proof of concept, to build a fan base, to prove out your idea to the world, to refine your idea what their feedback, and get pre-sales all without giving up any equity of your company. It’s really a no brainer and it’s something that I think is probably still under utilized.

Mike Watts: 10:21
So crowd funding is something I would lean on more and taking smaller, affordable steps. I think that’s really important. I’ve overstepped a few times with the confidence, over confidence, that I needed to buy a lot of product because this thing’s going to blow up instantly, and I know already exactly the version that’s going to work. So I need to order a ton of them from China or whatever, bring in big quantities of them. And then something happens, whether it’s a low quality product or you need to change the design or something along those lines. So take affordable steps and prove to yourself that the market wants it and that they’re willing to pay for it and then worry about the profitability later once you’ve proven that there is demand.

Stacy Jones: 11:12
That makes sense, 100%. And so, with everything that you’ve done, you also went down the path and you worked with Shark Tank in a matter of ways.

Mike Watts: 11:29
Yeah.

Stacy Jones: 11:29
Can you tell our listeners a little bit more about that? Because I will say, we get so many companies who talk to us at our agency, and they’re like, “I want to be on Shark Tank. If I’m on Shark Tank, it will make me, I will be a success. This is how I’m going to make my millions.” Can you give a little bit of insight on how it all really works?

Mike Watts: 11:50
Right. I think maybe we’ve met, because that’s exactly who I was at the time. I was so convinced that I was going, that that was my destiny, and that I was going to be on Shark Tank, and I had already picked out the shark that I wanted, I knew which way I was going to stand and face him and I had the whole script written out for my pitch and what I was going to wear and everything down to the final. I knew that that was my destiny.

Mike Watts: 12:17
And so we went and we were at the consumer electronics show and we auditioned, they had an open call and we auditioned for Shark Tank and we went and pitched the producers. They loved it. We gave them samples, it was a big win. They’re like, “Oh yeah, you’re definitely made for this. This is great.” And they sent us an email shortly after, “Congratulations, you’ve made it through to the second round of Shark Tank auditions.” It was like, “Here we go.” This was me and my father, side by side. What a cool thing to get to do together.

Mike Watts: 12:50
So we take it and we fill out the form, and it’s like 100 pages long, literally. And you have to fill it out with blue ink and it’s everything about your company and your competitors and your intellectual property and where’s your market and how big is your market and have you ever met a shark? And if you have, who have you met? And they want to… They’re looking for all the reasons to disqualify you, I figured out later. Like all the reasons why they won’t pick you. And then we had to make a 10 minute video.

Mike Watts: 13:19
And so, we worked so hard making this video, and we sent it all in and we were praying over the package before it left. And then we’re waiting and waiting. It was about three weeks later, and finally we got our answer that came back, like, “Sorry, you guys were not selected to be on air on Shark Tank.” Boy, we were just crushed. Absolutely crushed. But, persistence, you know, right? That’s the winner.

Mike Watts: 13:43
And so we went back again the next year and we redid it and the same result, got to the second round, filled out our… Made a even better video. Same result. “Sorry, you’re just not right for the show.” And I was so distraught, I was like, “I knew that this is how it’s supposed to go. I knew. Yes, I understand there’s tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands of applications, but our product’s so perfect, and it’s… I want this so bad.”

Mike Watts: 14:11
But as it turns out, just a few days later, I’m checking the website orders on our website and I see an order from the Shark Group, and I’m like, “What’s that?” And I looked it up and I was like, “That’s Daymond John’s company and that’s the shark I wanted to get. Oh, my goodness.” And so, I immediately got on the phone and called the number on the order and I got this young lady named Simone and she answered and she was so nice and I was like, “Oh, I’m such a big fan of Daymond and, oh, I’m so excited that he… ” Like, “Oh yeah, he loves your product. He got some, I guess he got them on set or something and he loves them. And he wants to order them from the office here.”

Mike Watts: 14:51
And so I made a bunch of samples and kept sending them to his office and got all his team falling in love with the product, and just kept doing that and built relationships with them. Didn’t ask or anything else. And then a few months later the phone rings and it’s Daymond’s president of the Shark Group, and he says, “Hey, Daymond doesn’t do this, but he wants to work with you guys. He thinks you have a great product. He’s watching you from a distance. He looks like he thinks you’re a good operator of your business and he’d like to work with you.” I’m like, “Okay.” Well now I’m in Shark Tank pitch mode, and like, “Okay, well my valuation is going to be two million dollars and we’re going to offer… ” And they’re like, “No, no, no, no, no. That’s not what we’re talking about really. You don’t understand the power of a shark. You don’t understand how much that I can bring to the table with my Rolodex and my contacts and my brand knowhow and my branding agency and all my team that it can be a resource for you. This is going to be huge for you guys.” I’m like, “Okay, I get it, I get it. But, you know, I’ve invested all this money already.”

Mike Watts: 15:53
And so, I actually walked away from the deal the first time because it was going to be a noncash deal and I just didn’t see enough value there to give up a piece of my company for no money. And as it turns out, a couple months went by and I think I maybe earned a little respect that way too. And the phone rings again and he’s like, “Hey, he really still wants to work with you and hope you see the value in it. So, what can we do to make a deal?” I said, “Well, I’ll tell you what, you say that you can blow my sales up. Right? How about I give you a chance to do that? You double my sales, things that I can point to that you do and you double my sales in 24 months. Give you 24 months to do it. And if you do that, you’re going to earn a piece of the company, small piece of the company.” And he’s like, “You got a deal. Let me show you what I got.”

Mike Watts: 16:42
It took him six months to double my sales, and put us on Good Morning America, we got on The Home Shopping Network. Instantly, he starts flipping that Rolodex out and turning it out. And the best thing about the whole deal is, because of the way that we built a relationship, Daymond is a personal friend of mine, which is an absolutely dream come true. And he’s just the most amazing mentor I could ever dream of. So I just walked into this dreamland. Just last night I sent him a text and we’re going to be going to meet with Walmart in about two weeks. They invited us because we’re made in America and super excited about that.

Mike Watts: 17:19
So I was able to text him and be like, “Hey, Daymond, you think you could help make a video for me to show to the buyer when we go?” He’d be like, “Hey, I wish I could be here, but I can’t.” And he’s like, “Yeah, no problem.” So, I expect that later this afternoon he’s going to send me a video clip I’m going to get to use. And I have accessed to his team, anything I need he’s there for us. And he’s really a genuinely close personal friend at this point. So it’s an amazing way that it all turned out. But it wasn’t, again, it wasn’t exactly the way I thought. And I think that’s sort of entrepreneurship in a candid kind of way.

Stacy Jones: 17:54
No, that totally makes sense. Absolutely. And that’s an awesome story.

Mike Watts: 17:58
Thank you. I still can’t believe it, every time I say it.

Stacy Jones: 18:02
Yeah. And you were sitting there thinking, “Okay, I’m going to get this giant check and that’s how they’re going to work with me and it’s going to help me have capitals, invest my company, and I’ll keep on trucking along just like I’ve been doing. And he delivered something that was different, which was a marketing machine.

Mike Watts: 18:17
And entirely more powerful than capital. Money’s not what’s going to solve most of your problems. In the short term, it might feel like it is, but money’s not going to fix things. But having a partner like that, that can help you make good decisions and help you get access and exposure. Access is where it’s at. You know that, right, working in LA. But it gets you access to the right people that can make things happen. And time and time again, we’ve been handing these things out to super celebrities, to big brands, to all kinds, all because of him. It’s been amazing.

Stacy Jones: 18:55
Well, there’s so many times, like in our world of LA and entertainment, working with movies is an example, we’ll do partnerships with brands, and they’re like, “Well how much money can I pay to be in that movie?” And it’s not actually about that, because the movie is like, “I don’t care about your $100,000, quite frankly. I don’t care about $500,000. I want to know what you can do to market my movie. How can you incorporate my movie into your advertising to get me into new places, at retail stores, new eyeballs, in through TV, or through digital that I don’t have to pay millions of dollars for?”

Stacy Jones: 19:29
And so, if the biggest studios in the world look at how they can do collaborations, it makes sense that business entrepreneurs also look at how they can do collaborations or strategic partnerships with other people where it’s not necessarily just writing a check.

Mike Watts: 19:47
You’re spot on, Stacy. The best things that have ever happened in my business all the way through have been win/win propositions, where I’m able to bring some sort of value, and my partner, whether it’s a distributor or somebody like Daymond or even a customer group or an advertising agency, and we’ll do a trade. We do trades all the time with products still to this day. We have NASCAR racers we trade with. Like constantly we’re doing deals where it’s a win/win scenario for both of us. And the more that you can find those as an entrepreneur, the more you’re going to win.

Stacy Jones: 20:24
Right, because they’re really invaluable. There’s not a way that you can put a price on it. It’s like Mastercard, it’s priceless. It really is. Because these things don’t exist where you could kind of take the true value based off of a dollar spent.

Stacy Jones: 20:40
So, you teach entrepreneurship classes over at Texas A&M. What are some of the favorite topics that you like talking with the students about in this world that you think are important for them to learn?

Mike Watts: 20:55
So, I think that it’s… I always find myself coming back to sort of breaking the traditional mold or the story that we’ve all been told for many, many years about the path of success. The path of success is do good in school so you can get a good job so you can work for a big company with security and save up and eventually at 65 you can check in, climb on your cruise ship and sail off in the sunset. And that’s what people would define as success in a lot of ways. More and more and more today, entrepreneurship is becoming the preferred path, the path that has the most potential, the path that offers the best lifestyle and has so many new avenues.

Mike Watts: 21:45
And I would say even that as an entrepreneur, if you choose that path, you have more tools and flexibility and an advantage even over larger companies who that by their bureaucratic nature can’t actually function when things happen and change in the marketplace, when LinkedIn becomes the marketing place. All of a sudden companies don’t know how to deal with that, but an entrepreneur can step in and do something about it.

Mike Watts: 22:15
And so, I just think that it’s important to talk to college students and plant that seed that they can charge their own path with no shame and they have to believe in themselves that they can do it and they don’t have to do it the way that their parents did it or that their grandparents did it because it’s a new world. It really is. And if they can believe in it. And I think just telling my story often is where it all comes back to because when anytime somebody can hear an actual story from someone who took a risk and then was rewarded in a big way and then did it again and was rewarded and they see that it’s real, now it’s real for them, too. So I think the more that us entrepreneurs can share our stories with the next generation and inspire them to take the risks necessary for success, the better off the world’s going to be.

Stacy Jones: 23:08
I agree with that. I think also, because we work with and have a lot of interns who are college students who will work with us because I love having that life in our agency and being able to do the education aspects of it. But I think one of the biggest things that I actually liked sharing with them also is not the successes but the failures and showing that you still keep on ticking, that just because you fail, that you’re going to get back up and you’re going to persevere and you’re going to wake up that next morning and you’re going to take another step forward, because what I see a lot with this generation is that if they don’t find success immediately they stop and they give up and they don’t keep charging for it. And that’s not for everyone to say, but I see it often.

Mike Watts: 23:54
Yup. No, that’s very true. And one of the cool things about working with Daymond is that I’ve gotten to meet most of the sharks now. And so, when I met Barbara Corcoran, she talked about this. She said this, when she meets with her entrepreneurs from Shark Tank, that if they ever come into her office, she has pictures of them all on the wall, and if they ever come into her office and they start saying, “Hey, well this happened to our company and this is bad and start to grovel and feel bad about themselves, about some challenge that they just ran into and they can’t get over it and they’re really not sure what to do, she goes over and she turns their picture upside down and will never take another meeting with them again, because she’s got no time for people that sit around and feel sorry for themself.

Mike Watts: 24:41
And that sounds harsh, right? And maybe it is. She’s a pretty boisterous woman. But you can’t argue with her success. But I think it makes a good point because, ultimately, you have to embrace these failures, “failures” and things happen as part of the process, a necessary part of the process. And that’s how you learn. That’s how you figure things out. If everything goes perfectly for the first three years you better watch out because when you do make a mistake it’s going to be really expensive because you’re further along. So, make your mistakes early, embrace them, learn from them. But what she said is that it’s the difference in time between the time you hit the hurdle and fall down and the time that you get back up. That delta is ultimately what defines a successful entrepreneur versus one who’s going to fail.

Stacy Jones: 25:29
Wow. That’s a very good point as well. Are there any other points that you want to share? You’ve done quite a few that are fantastic, point here, point there. But is there any other advice, let me say instead, that you would like to share with our listeners today?

Mike Watts: 25:46
Well, I would say that it’s really important for you to take care of yourself along the way. It’s real easy for entrepreneurs, I see it a lot, to get burnout and to tax themself too hard. So I think that it sounds like a very… It’s a tactical thing for me. I have a morning routine that I have that if I didn’t have that, I don’t think that I would be able to find the success I do. Every morning I get up, 100 pushups, I do my prayer, I look at my goals, I’m writing down my goals for the day specifically, I’m in putting some sort of podcast like this show into my mind, stimulating my mind and exercising, and then I head out for the day with a good breakfast.

Mike Watts: 26:39
And I know that sounds like maybe a simple version, but, for me, starting the day out right and knowing the two or three things that I want to get done that one day is so important, because otherwise the chaos of the inbox and the chaos of the phone is going to dictate to you what your day looks like rather than you dictating what your day looks like.

Mike Watts: 26:59
And so, I think it’s important that we think about… And, obviously, this applies across all sorts of different lifestyles or roles or whatever, but as an entrepreneur, I think it’s especially important that we do that, we ground ourselves, center ourself first in the day before we go try to accomplish something that we want to get done.

Stacy Jones: 27:22
That is excellent advice as well. So you want to get micro-focused on what your actual goals are for the day so that the day doesn’t take over you.

Mike Watts: 27:30
That’s right. Yep. That’s the only way you’ll actually get them done, because otherwise it’ll suck the life out of you.

Stacy Jones: 27:36
Yeah. Or you can be, you know, your day goes, you don’t get them done and then at 11:00 at night you’re trying to pound them in before you go to sleep. So that’s the other alternative to it, which is not a fun one.

Mike Watts: 27:47
Right. Yep.

Stacy Jones: 27:48
I speak from experience here.

Mike Watts: 27:50
Right. Well I can relate. I can relate, too.

Stacy Jones: 27:53
So, if our listeners want to learn more about Love Handles, since it’s this fantastic corporate branded opportunity, how can they learn more? Where should they go?

Mike Watts: 28:06
So, just lovehandle.com and just click on Love Handle for business. You can shop our cute collections for gifts. But for business it’s a really, I sincerely mean this, it’s the most effective marketing tool you can get. Because, as marketers, what we want to do is we want to create conversations downstream. Right? When we’re not there, we want whatever we’ve done to create a conversation somewhere. So having a super useful phone grip on the back of your phone, people ask about it. “Where’d you get that?” “Oh, I got it from this.” Insert your brand name. Right? Plus they come on custom cards.

Mike Watts: 28:40
So like if you’ve ever been to a trade show and you walk up to somebody’s booth and they’ll have their giveaway items, they’ll have koozies or stress balls or something, and then they’ll have their brochure next to it. Who picks up the brochure? Nobody.

Stacy Jones: 28:53
No one.

Mike Watts: 28:53
They’re going to pick up the stuff. Right? So we’ve taken the stuff and stuck it to the brochure. And we do all that in house so you get a marketing piece plus a promo item together and it’s really very effective and super fun to give away. So, yeah. And it’s 100% American made. So check out lovehandle.com. I’ve actually made a coupon code for you.

Stacy Jones: 29:16
Perfect. That’s awesome. Look at that.

Mike Watts: 29:18
Do you want to put it in the show notes or do you want me to announce it?

Stacy Jones: 29:21
You should announce it and we will put it in the show notes. We will plus that up.

Mike Watts: 29:25
All right, so Hollywood Branded is the name of the coupon code, if that works for you.

Stacy Jones: 29:31
Perfect.

Mike Watts: 29:31
And, yep, so your listeners will get 10% off their order. So just check out, just use the word Hollywood Branded and you’ll get 10% off at lovehandle.com.

Stacy Jones: 29:41
Very cool. That is awesome. Thank you for that.

Mike Watts: 29:44
Yeah, you’re welcome.

Stacy Jones: 29:45
And then, yeah, it’s really cool. Because if you are a koozie or if you’re a stress ball, yeah, those are fun to pick up at conferences. I mean, we’ll all fill our bags that we’re leveraging around with all of that awesome stuff. But when you get home, it just goes in a corner or the dog gets the ball or the kids get the ball and you actually have something that someone’s going to put onto something they touch. Not like once or twice a day, but hundreds of times a day with their phone and seeing that.

Mike Watts: 30:13
Or if you’re like my daughter, you touch it once a day, which is all day.

Stacy Jones: 30:17
All the day. It’s just on her hand permanently.

Mike Watts: 30:20
Permanent, yes.

Stacy Jones: 30:21
She looks like she’s grown a phone in her hand at this point, pretty much.

Mike Watts: 30:24
I think so. I think it’s attached.

Stacy Jones: 30:25
Yeah. Well, I just want to say thank you so much for being on today. This was fantastic. Your advice is invaluable for entrepreneurs. You have obviously walked the road and had massive success and some blips along the way that have made you even stronger. So thank you for sharing that.

Mike Watts: 30:43
Thank you for having me. It’s been really fun.

Stacy Jones: 30:45
And, to our listeners, thank you for tuning in to Marketing Mistakes and How to Avoid Them. I look forward to chatting with you on our next podcast.

 

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